Thursday, 23 May 2013

Interoperability between Embedded and Server Endpoints is here!

As mentioned by Mircea in the Infinispan 5.3.0.Beta2 release blog post, interoperability between embedded Infinispan and remote Infinispan modes, including Hot Rod, Memcached and REST is now here!

What this means is that you should be able to store data via one of the endpoints and retrieve data from a different one. So, I can store an Java object using the Java Hot Rod client, and I can retrieve it using the embedded interface.

Documentation for this new interoperability, or compatibility mode, can be found here, including the key aspects of this new functionality, configuration and links to some examples.

As we head towards the later part of the Infinispan 5.3 series, if you’re interested in accessing data in multiple ways, give it a go and let us know what you think!

Cheers, Galder

Posted by Galder Zamarreño on 2013-05-23
Tags: hotrod interoperability memcached rest

Thursday, 31 May 2012

Infinispan 5.1.5 goes FINAL!

Infinispan 'Brahma' 5.1.5.FINAL has now been released fixing a whole bunch of issues around cache store preloading of distributed caches, Memcached server, tree module and Hot Rod client performance. We’ve also updated several libraries such as Netty (to 3.4.6) and JGroups (to 3.0.10).

Full details of what has been fixed can be found here, and if you have feedback, please visit our forums. Finally, as always, you can download the release from here.

Cheers, Galder

Posted by Galder Zamarreño on 2012-05-31
Tags: release hotrod memcached jgroups cache store netty

Wednesday, 28 March 2012

Infinispan 5.1.3.FINAL is here!

Infinispan 5.1.3.FINAL is out now after having received very positive feedback on 5.1.3.CR1 and fixing some other issues on top of that, such as the file cache store leaving files open, improving standalone Infinispan Memcached implementation performance, and including Infinispan CDI extension jars in our distribution.

"Release early, release often", that’s out motto, so we’ll carry on taking feedback onboard and releasing new Infinispan versions where we improve on what we’ve done in the past apart from coming out with new goodies.

Thanks to everyone, both users who have been getting in touch to provide their feedback and developers who have been quickly reacting to users fixing issues and implementing requested features.

Full details of what has been fixed in FINAL (including CR1) can be found here, and if you have feedback, please visit our forums. Finally, as always, you can download the release from here.

Cheers, Galder

Posted by Galder Zamarreño on 2012-03-28
Tags: release memcached cdi final performance

Thursday, 13 May 2010

Client/Server architectures strike back, Infinispan 4.1.0.Beta1 is out!

I’m delighted to announce the release of Infinispan 4.1.0.BETA1. For this, our first beta release of the 4.1 series, we’ve finished Hot Rod and Memcached based server implementations and a Java-based Hot Rod client has been developed as a reference implementation. Starting with 4.1.0.BETA1 as well, thanks to help of Tom Fenelly, Infinispan caches can be exposed over a WebSocket.

A detailed change log is available and the release is downloadable from the usual place.

For the rest of the blog post, we’d like to share some of the objectives of Infinispan 4.1 with the community. Here at ‘chez Infinispan’ we’ve been repeating the same story over and over again: http://www.parleys.com/sl=1&st=5&id=1589[‘Memory is the new Disk, Disk is the new Tape’] and this release is yet another step to educate the community on this fact. Client/Server architectures based around [#SPELLING_ERROR_12 .blsp-spelling-error]#Infinispan data grids are key to enabling this reality but in case you might be wondering, why would someone use Infinispan in a client/server mode compared to using it as peer-to-peer (p2p) mode? How does the client/server architecture enable memory to become the new disk?

Broadly speaking, there three areas where a Infinispan client/server architecture might be chosen over p2p one:

1. Access to Infinispan from a non-JVM environment

Infinispan’s roots can be traced back to JBoss Cache, a caching library developed to provide J2[SPELLING_ERROR_19 .blsp-spelling-error]#EE application servers with data replication. As such, the primary way of accessing Infinispan or JBoss Cache has always been via direct calls coming from the same JVM. However, as we have repeated it before, Infinispan’s goal is to provide much more than that, it aims to provide data grid access to any software application that you can think of and this obviously requires Infinispan to enable access from non-Java environments.

Infinispan comes with a series of server modules that enable that precisely. All you have to do is decide which API suits your environment best. Do you want to enable access direct access to Infinispan via HTTP? Just use our REST or WebSocket modules. Or is it the case that you’re looking to expand the capabilities of your Memcached based applications? Start an Infinispan-backed and your existing Memcached clients will be able to talk to it immediately. Or maybe even you’re interested in accessing Infinispan via Hot Rod? Then, gives us a hand developing non-Java clients that can talk the Hot Rod protocol! :).

2. Infinispan as a dedicated data tier

Quite often applications running running a p2p environment have caching requirements larger than the heap size in which case it makes a lot of sense to separate caching into a separate dedicated tier.

It’s also very common to find businesses with varying work loads overtime where there’s a need to start business processing servers to deal with increased load, or stop them when work load is reduced to lower power consumption. When Infinispan data grid instances are deployed alongside business processing servers, starting/stopping these can be a slow process due to state transfer, or rehashing, particularly when large data sets are used. Separating Infinispan into a dedicated tier provides faster and more predictable server start/stop procedures – ideal for modern cloud-based deployments where elasticity in your application tier is important.

It’s common knowledge that optimizations for large memory usage systems compared to optimizations for CPU intensive systems are very different. If you mix both your data grid and business logic under the same roof, finding a balanced set of optimizations that keeps both sides happy is difficult. Once again, separating the data and business tiers can alleviate this problem.

You might be wondering that if Infinispan is moved to a separate tier, access to data now requires a network call and hence will hurt your performance in terms of time per call. However, separating tiers gives you a much more scalable architecture and your data is never more than 1 network call away. Even if the dedicated Infinispan data grid is configured with distribution, a Hot Rod smart-client implementation - such as the Java reference implementation shipped with Infinispan 4.1.0.BETA1 - can determine where a particular key is located and hit a server that contains it directly.

3. Data-as-a-Service (DaaS)

Increasingly, we see scenarios where environments host a multitude of applications that share the need for data storage, for example in Plattform-as-a-Service cloud-style environments (whether public or internal). In such configurations, you don’t want to be launching a data grid per each application since it’d be a nightmare to maintain – not to mention resource-wasteful. Instead you want deployments or applications to start processing as soon as possible. In these cases, it’d make a lot of sense to keep a pool of Infinispan data grid nodes acting as a shared storage tier. Isolated cache access could easily achieved by making sure each application uses a different cache name (i.e. the application name could be used as cache name). This can easily achieved with protocols such as Hot Rod where each operation requires a cache name to be provided.

Regardless of the scenarios explained above, there’re some common benefits to separating an Infinispan data grid from the business logic that accesses it. In fact, these are very similar to the benefits achieved when application servers and databases don’t run under the same roof. By separating the layers, you can manage each layer independently, which means that adding/removing nodes, maintenance, upgrades…​etc can be handled independently. In other words, if you wanna upgrade your application server or servlet container, you don’t need to bring down your data layer.

All of this is available to you now, but the story does not end here. Bearing in mind that these client/server modules are based around reliable TCP/IP, using Netty, they could also in the future form the base of new functionality. For example, client/server modules could be linked together to connect geographically separated Infinispan data grids and enable different disaster recovery strategies.

So, download Infinispan 4.1.0.BETA1 righty, give a try to these new modules and let us know your thoughts.

Finally, don’t forget that we’ll be talking about Hot Rod in Boston at the end of June for the first ever JUDCon. Don’t miss out!

Cheers,

Galder

Posted by Galder Zamarreño on 2010-05-13
Tags: hotrod websocket memcached rest cloud storage

Friday, 12 March 2010

No time to rest, 4.1.0.Alpha1 is here!

"Release quick, release often", that’s one of our mottos at Infinispan. Barely a couple of weeks after releasing Infinispan 4.0.0.Final, here comes 4.1.0.Alpha1 with new goodies. The main star for this release is the new server module implementing Memcached’s text protocol.

This new module enables you to use Infinispan as a replacement for any of your Memcached servers with the added bonus that Infinispan’s Memcached server module allows you to start several instances forming a cluster so that they replicate, invalidate or distribute data between these instances, a feature not present in default Memcached implementation.

On top of the clustering capabilities Infinispan memcached server module gets in-built eviction, cache store support, JMX/Jopr monitoring etc…​ for free.

To get started, first download Infinispan 4.1.0.Alpha1. Then, go to "Using Infinispan Memcached Server" wiki and follow the instructions there. If you’re interested in finding out how to set up multiple Infinispan memcached servers in a cluster, head to "Talking To Infinispan Memcached Servers From Non-Java Clients" wiki where you’ll also find out how to access our Memcached implementation from non-Java clients.

Finally, you can find the API docs for 4.1.0.Alpha 1 here and note that this is an unstable release that is meant to gather feedback on the Memcached server module as early as possible.

Cheers, Galder

Posted by Galder Zamarreño on 2010-03-12
Tags: release memcached

Friday, 12 February 2010

Poll: How do you interact with Infinispan?

While discussing the different ways to interact with Infinispan, we decided to open up a poll so that people tell us how they expect to be using Infinispan. Do you use Infinispan directly on the same VM? Or do you use REST? Are you planning to interact via memcached or Hot Rod interface?

The poll can be found here. Please make sure that if you vote, you add a comment indicating the reasons why you chosen that option.

Cheers, Galder

Posted by Galder Zamarreño on 2010-02-12
Tags: hotrod memcached rest

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